Lake Burrumbeet

 

The Lake Burrumbeet is 350mm below full and the water will continue to reduce with the warmer weather.

Most of the boats that will make it out onto the water will be small tinnie’s or canoe or kayaks.

The likely hood of the lake being usable in summer is highly unlikely due to BGA returning or the water level is just that low it will be impossible to get boats on the water.

COB will continue to monitor the water for BGA. Lake Burrumbeet has historically over the warmer summer months been susceptible to Blue Green Algae Blooms. These algae blooms are usually identified by a green scum on the surface of the water . Please do not enter the water if a scum or blue green colour to the water is evident and to contact the City of Ballarat.  

In 2013 management of Lake Burrumbeet was passed to the Department of Environment and Primary Industries ( DEPI ).

About Lake Burrumbeet 

Lake Burrumbeet, 20 kilometres west of Ballarat, is a place for family fun, water sports and quiet reflection. The reserve’s natural beauty features parkland, grasslands and woodlands set against the lake background.


The area is popular for family activities, camping, and open space recreation. People enjoy fishing, hunting, boating, water skiing and bush camping, and also spend time bird watching, rambling, dog walking and picnicking. Vehicles should be driven on roads and formed tracks only.

For information about the lake reserve, contact the DELWP Customer Service Centre on 136 186.

 


MapTop of document.


Fishing and BoatingTop of document.

Fishing and Hunting 

Lake Burrumbeet is a well-known fishing area, for both shoreline and boat fishing. The lake contains Rainbow and Brown Trout, Redfin Perch, Roach, European Carp (declared a noxious species) and a number of native fish species.

Hunting for game birds is permitted during the annual duck season and for pest animals throughout the year. Hunting is not permitted in recreation nodes and near boat ramps and buildings.

 

Boating and water skiing

Lake Burrumbeet is popular for boating and water skiing. The Burrumbeet Ski Club is on the southern shore and several boat ramps are located around the reserve. The City of Ballarat monitors water levels and levels of Blue-Green algae. When the lake level is low, boat speeds will be restricted or the lake closed, and signs will be posted



Activities and CampingTop of document.

Family activities

The north eastern area, with its picturesque parkland setting and sealed tracks, is an ideal space for family recreation. Visitors can enjoy a variety of activities from family picnics to swimming and boating. The cricket oval is located in this area, along with a kiosk and public toilet facilities. Visitors have access to the boat ramp in the Lake Burrumbeet Caravan Park. The area adjoins Burrumbeet Racecourse. DELWP and City of Ballarat ask campers to take their rubbish away when they leave the reserve.

Camping

Lake Burrumbeet Caravan Park, on the north eastern side of the lake, offers powered caravanning and camping, and boat access to the lake via the park’s boat ramp. People may also camp in the southern and western recreation nodes however these areas have no facilities. Campsites must be at least 20 metres from the water. All campfires must be in accordance with CFA regulations. Collection of firewood is not permitted. DELWP and City of Ballarat ask campers to take their rubbish away when they leave the reserve.

Nature observation

Lake Burrumbeet offers many opportunities to observe nature. The area contains valuable grassland and Eucalypt woodland and is home to significant hollow bearing trees, including a magnificent stand of 500 year old River Redgums.

The area is habitat for the Growling Grass Frog and the Golden Sun Moth and the lake is a potential breeding and roosting site for wetland birds, such as the Brolga, the Freckled Duck and the Pelican.

 

 


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